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Viewing entries in the Form Design category.


By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
December 20, 2013

0 comments

Form Design

We’ve all been in this situation before: You make a purchase online and afterwards you are asked to fill out a survey about your experience. Because you don’t want to appear rude, you agree to it, but you soon regret it. Whether it’s due to superfluous questions, too many pages, too many options or too few, a poorly composed customer satisfaction survey will annoy your customers and produce little in regard to information.

This is a shame because Customer Satisfaction HTML forms can be of great benefit to a business. You can send out HTML forms to a wider audience in a shorter amount of time than you ever could with paper forms – and you can get results much more quickly. Once you get your results, you can organize, share and present this information in a fashion that will enable you to provide the best possible service and products to your customers.  It’s a Win-Win – that is if you create a quality survey.
 
A major component of this will be in the types of questions you use. Here are some things to keep in mind:

Vary the Types of Questions You Ask

Survey questions can ask the user to answer through a variety of methods. The most common types of questions include
Single-Select, Multiple Choices: Of the following, which one most closely...
Multi-Select, Multiple Choices: Choose all that apply…
Rate on a Scale: How satisfied were you…Very, Somewhat, Neutral…
Open Answer: In your own words…; Fill in the Blank
Asking a variety of different types of questions will keep the participant interested and prevent them from going through the motions.

Ask Questions about the Experience

A single experience could make or break whether or not a customer comes back. A survey can provide information on what the average experience is for a customer and whether or not that matches your company’s core values. Open Answer questions and Rate on a Scale questions are great ways to get this valuable information. These include:
• How satisfied were you with the experience?
• Will you shop you again?
• Would you recommend this product to a friend or family member?

Ask Questions about Perception/Experience

Questions about how a user perceives and has used your business in the past can provide details about how the community feels about and uses your business. Questions should include
• What do you think our business does?
• What are our best products/services?
• How many times have you used our service/product in the last year?

Ask Questions that Provide Demographics

Details about age, gender, location, salary and more can help you understand your client base and whether or not you’re catering to your core base, or if you need to expand your efforts. But be careful not to make these questions required. The goal is to collect as much information as possible, but in most cases, getting the key metrics and customer feedback trumps making fields required which may lead to lower completion rates.

Think very carefully about which fields need to be required as it will have an impact on your conversion rates.

Consider also, using a multi-page form with only 1 or 2 questions per page and record the data as you progress through the form. This way, if the user decides to abandon the form, you will have still been able to capture some information. Put the most important questions first to maximize this strategy.

Logiforms form building software can help you design and create intuitive and helpful customer satisfaction forms. Get started now —try our custom form builder for free for 15 days.

 

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
November 05, 2013

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Form Design

Let's face it: People hate to fill out forms. The next time you're in a waiting room of any kind, look around you. If there is a person frowning, there's a good chance they have a form on a clipboard resting on their lap. Filling out forms can be frustrating and confusing. And insurance companies face an even larger hurdle than other industries because there are so many variables involved in determining a rate. It's for this reason that many potential customers shop online to research quotes. They are looking for an intuitive, quick way to get a quote without all of the frustration and cumbersome questions. Therefore, to satisfy these requirements, insurance companies should incorporate these and other best practices when implementing their online form design.

Remove all Optional Fields

The goal of the web form is completion in order for the customer to get the quote price, which should hopefully then facilitate interest. Let's remember what an online insurance customer wants: He or she is looking for something that won't take much time, can be done without too much divulgence of information, and is easy to understand. To alleviate any anxieties the customer might have when they start the form, make it a point to eliminate all optional fields, if possible. Optional fields will only give the user more to scan and will lower the chance of completion. Any miscellaneous information can be addressed once the user receives the quote.

Label Your Fields to Best Address Customers' Intent

When a user fills out an insurance quote form, they want to fill it out quickly, but they also want to fill it out correctly. An error could result in a higher rate or denial after all. You'll never hear a person complain about their insurance being too low. Therefore, the form should be laid out in way that best serves their interaction with the form, and a major part component of this will be the labeling of the fields.  While top and right aligned labeling will encourage faster completion times than left aligned labeling, left aligned labeling may be better for accuracy as it forces more careful scanning. Still, as your quotes form should be simpler and devoid of advanced fields, top or right aligned field labeling would probably work best.

Ensure that the Customer Has a Clear Line to the Primary Action

In most cases, if you can, your quotes form will be on the home page, and it will not require multiple pages to fill out. Therefore, you won't need navigation buttons, a save button or a cancel button. You will then just have a primary action button, submit. As a result of this simple layout, it can be easy to dismiss the importance of the design and layout of the primary action button, but this is still the most important part of the form. If they don't click on the action, the form is useless. Therefore, make the submit button stand out and create it in a color that is different from the color of the form. It should be the first thing a user sees in the last scan line. If you do have secondary buttons due to multiple pages, differentiate them from the primary action button through color and include them after the primary action button to negate any confusion.

Form Design Software to Enable Good Design

The key to insurance form design is simplicity to encourage completion. Luckily, form design in itself does not have to be difficult either. Logiforms form design software delivers an intuitive platform to create the forms you want using these and other tips. For more information on how we can help you create the correct insurance forms you want to drive new business, contact us today.

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
May 15, 2012

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Form Design

The primary goal of anyone filling out your form is to complete it. Your goal is to make it as easy as possible for them to accomplish their goal. Follow these simple best practices to illuminate the path to completion and help your users accomplish their goal.

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
May 01, 2012

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Form Design

Web forms broker critical interactions between your business and your customer. Making it easier for your users to submit your forms, means more new users, more registrations, leads and revenue. There are a lot of ins and outs to effective web form design, the logiforms Form Designer automatically adheres to form design best practices which are proven to increase conversions from 10 to 40%

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
April 01, 2012

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Form Design

Lets face it, nobody enjoys filling out forms, let alone long forms. But there are some key steps you can take to make the process easier and less frustrating for your customers. On form re-design projects we've worked on, we've seen this simple technique increase customer satisfaction levels by up to 60% (based on optional post form completion survey results). The techniques are easy to implement and guaranteed to result in more leads, sales, conversions and satisfied customers

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
March 25, 2012

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Form Design

When the labels and inputs on your form are not enough to tell the user what they need to enter, help text can come to the rescue. Help Text is simply the process of including additional textual instructions on your form. But beware, if you find that you need a ton of help text on your form, then your input labels are not clear, or you may asking the wrong questions. Help Text is a double edged sword and requires careful implementation.

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
March 15, 2012

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Form Design

When you're collecting secure data through your forms, it's crucial that it's done over a secure channel. That's where SSL comes into play. SSL is the term that describes a secure connection and while the term may not be familiar, the lock icon in your browser surely is. Without a SSL Certificate from one of the leading providers, your form has no business collecting sensitive data - it can be easily hacked. And without SSL you'll drive away todays savey Internet users in droves. So how do you get a SSL certificate? You can pay hundreds of dollars to get your own, but why would you? As a logiforms customer you get to use our Extended Validation (EV) Certificate from Network Solutions. The EV cert is the enterprise class, best of breed certificate. When you use it, the browser bar turns green (other certs don't do this) to let your users know their using an ultra-secure and trusted form.

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
March 01, 2012

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Form Design

The goal is to make it as easy as possible for your user to complete your form. More completions equal more leads, more sales, more revenue. Read on to learn how making your forms "Smart" can dramatically improve the usability of your forms, resulting in more completions.

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
February 01, 2012

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Form Design

You would be amazed at the massive jump increase in conversion rates made possible by changing just this one thing. Improving a form's validation can have staggering results. Validation is one of those things that when done right is a powerful tool to help you collect the right information in the right format, but when done wrong, can have a serious effect on the number of leads,sales and submissions. Put simply, if you're not careful with form validation, it can very negatively affect your bottom line.

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
January 20, 2012

2 comments

Form Design

Have you ever filled out an online form only to be told that the cryptic series of letters and numbers you were asked to enter were incorrect? If you have then you know why we think Captchas suck. But why do we even have captchas?

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By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
January 01, 2012

0 comments

Form Design

It's important to let your users know that they have successfully completed your form. A success message should be just that, a pat on the back for your users to let them know all that tedious form filling is done and they have achieved their goal. Spell it out and let them know they've "Successfully Registered" or "Successfully been Entered to Win" etc. In addition to a clear and useful success message, it's usually a good idea to send an email to confirm the submission was received.

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